LIVING

Father: LIVING
Mother: LIVING


          ________
 _LIVING_|
|        |________
|
|--LIVING
|
|         _LIVING_
|_LIVING_|
         |_LIVING_

INDEX


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LIVING

Father: LIVING
Mother: LIVING


          _Theodore Lloyd BURT _
 _LIVING_|
|        |_LIVING_______________
|
|--LIVING
|
|         ______________________
|_LIVING_|
         |______________________

INDEX


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LIVING

Father: LIVING
Mother: LIVING


          _____________________
 _LIVING_|
|        |_____________________
|
|--LIVING
|
|         _George Myron BYBEE _
|_LIVING_|
         |_Louisa Ann STEWART _

INDEX


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LIVING

Father: LIVING
Mother: LIVING


          __________________________
 _LIVING_|
|        |__________________________
|
|--LIVING
|
|         _Gilbert Sheldon STEWART _
|_LIVING_|
         |_LIVING___________________

INDEX


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William Grainger LAMB

Father: William Samuel LAMB
Mother: Charlotte GRAINGER

Family 1: Marion PARIS


                        _Brigham Young LAMB ____
 _William Samuel LAMB _|
|                      |_Mary Ann Foster HARDY _
|
|--William Grainger LAMB 
|
|                       _Christopher GRAINGER __
|_Charlotte GRAINGER __|
                       |_Sarah Emma SALKFIELD __

INDEX

Notes

!BURIAL: The Nevada Tombstone Record Book, 979.3 V3n Vol 1. Researcher : Georgenia Stewart

BIOGRAPHY: Source: "The History of Pahranagat Valley" by Louise B. Stewa rt.

William Granger Lamb came to Nevada from utah. He was born in southern U tah in 1892, a son of William Lamb and Charlotte Granger Lamb .

Marion (Mayme) Pparis was born in Silver Reef, Utah. She came to Alamo w hen sh was 12 years old. On July 29, 1913, she and William G. Lamb wer e married. To them were born eleven children.

All the children grew up and attended school in Aalamo. All the boys gre w up riding horses and doing rodeo stunts, mostly in the corrals where th e horses were cared for. At any rate, they became excellent horsemen, a s was their father.

"Billy" as he was know to everyone, was a general handyman, doing all sor ts of work and being very good at it, too. His main interest was in catt le and horse and he rode for others frequently. He served as Janitor o f the school for several years, where his ready wit made him a favorite w ith teachers and children, too.

He was assisting at a rodeo in Fallon, Nevada, when a fractrous horse hea ded fo the crowd. Billy attempted to stop the horse and in so doing wa s fatally injured.


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Eliza Ann LUND

Father: Wilson LUND
Mother: Eliza Ann BRACE

Family 1: Reuben Joseph FARNSWORTH
  1.  (Stillborn) FARNSWORTH
  2.  Reuben Joseph FARNSWORTH
  3. +Franklin Wilson FARNSWORTH
  4.  Eliza FARNSWORTH
  5.  LIVING

                    __
 _Wilson LUND _____|
|                  |__
|
|--Eliza Ann LUND 
|
|                   __
|_Eliza Ann BRACE _|
                   |__

INDEX


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Alvin PAXTON

Father: Daniel Donaldson PAXTON
Mother: Sarah Pamelia STEVENS

Family 1:

  1. +Stephen Cleve PAXTON

                            __
 _Daniel Donaldson PAXTON _|
|                          |__
|
|--Alvin PAXTON 
|
|                           __
|_Sarah Pamelia STEVENS ___|
                           |__

INDEX


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David SMITH

Family 1: Rebecca GIBSON
  1.  W. R. SMITH

    __
 __|
|  |__
|
|--David SMITH 
|
|   __
|__|
   |__

INDEX


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Margery WILKERSON

Father: Thomas WILKERSON
Mother: Eliza FOLLOWELL

Family 1: Levi STEWART
  1. +William Thomas STEWART
  2. +Eliza Luella STEWART
  3.  Charles Courtland STEWART
  4. +Margery Ann STEWART
  5.  Herbert Carlos STEWART
  6.  Edward Lorenzo STEWART
  7. +Lucinda Araminta STEWART
  8.  Hyrum Smith STEWART

                     _David WILKERSON ______
 _Thomas WILKERSON _|
|                   |_Elizabeth KING _______
|
|--Margery WILKERSON 
|
|                    _William F. FOLLOWELL _
|_Eliza FOLLOWELL __|
                    |_Margery MILES ________

INDEX

Notes

MARRIAGE: In 1852, a friend, Brother Wimmer, drove up with a company o f emigrants. When Levi came across to see him he said, "Brother Levi , I have brought you a wife." Levi said, "Well, that's nice," thinking li ttle of it. But a few minutes later a young girl not yet twenty steppe d from behind one of the wagons and was introduced to him as Margery Wilk erson. A quick friendship between Levi and Margery developed into a life long devotion. They were married four months later, December 1852 in th e Office of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Sai nts, Salt Lake City, Utah. SOURCE: Some Incident in the Life of Levi Ste wart, Founder of Kanab Utah, History of Kane Co, by Marjery Browne Cottam , p 545 Researcher: Georgenia Stewart

DEATH: In December of that same first year, 1870, came the tragedy tha t was to leave its scar on the lives of this family and almost disrupt th e entire settlement of Kanab, Utah. The Navajo and Northern Indians ha d been making raids on the settlements. The young men took turns guardin g the cattle at night from a small dugout in the side of a hill. The oth er men took turns guarding the fort. Once Jacob Hamblin persuaded the Na vajos to come to Kanab and hold a peace conferenc as there was always ten sion.
On the night of December 14, the guard who was to relieve Brother Pugh a s guard at one o'clock did no awaken but seemed to be overpowered with sl eep. He was roused once, then twice, and even started to dress. Brothe r Pugh went home and to bed, thinking all was well, but in some way the g uard fell back over on the bed asleep, leaving the fort unguarded. At fo ur o'clock, fire was discovered in the Stewart section of the fort. Litt le Lucinda remembers how her father rushed to see what he could do. Marg ery quickly threw a spread around herself and rushed over to the burnin g portion. Their own room was safe as it was separated from the burnin g part by many feet. There was a space left for another room which had n ot yet been built and which was protected only by a row of wagons drawn t ogether. These wagons were used as sleeping quarters for some of the old er children. The kitchen roof was already ablaze so there was no hope o f saving that part of the house. But in the bedroom next to it, the on e on the corner, slept the boys, Margery's three, Artimacy's two, a hire d man, and Levi, the youngest son of the first wife, Melinda. This roo m had no windows as did none of the outside rooms of the fort in order t o make them impregnable to the Indians. The only exit was through the fl aming kitchen. Levi and the other men, knowing that this bedroom held st ores of kerosene and powder, seized axes and started battering out the lo gs of the wall. They got two logs out and crawled through into the suffo cating smoke-filled room. They found the beds empty and no one in the ro om. It was impossible to get into the blazing inferno of the kitchen. T hey knew that the smoking powder and kerosene might explode any minute, s o they crawled back out. Levi ordered the others out and carried two keg s of powder already smoking and dumped them into the creek. Then the ker osene exploded and went up in flames.
Little did Levi realize what was happening on the other side of the kitch en. When Margery rushed out of their bedroom, she immediately took in th e situation and knew that the only hope for the boys was through the kitc hen. Her mother's love was greater than her fears or her reasoning power , and unseen by any except her daughter Ella, who happened to be there fr om Pipe Springs, she rushed into the flames. Ella tried to follow her mo ther but was held back by the men. Once in the kitchen, Margery met Arti macy's boy Alonzo Lafayette and the hired man, Harvey Stout, who, blinde d by the smoke, were groping around trying to find an exit. She pushed t hem through the door and turned to find the others. No one knows what re ally happened then. The explosion prevented anyone else from entering . They found the six charred bodies; the mother and three boys were foun d huddled in the immense fireplace as if she had been trying to lift the m up the chimney. One was under the big stove, less burned than the othe rs. They dug out the bodies and sadly buried them in one grave. Alonz o told afterward of how his brother, Levi had tried, when they found them selves trapped, to lift the sod roof of the bedroom, but it had been to o firmly packed with grass and willows.
The funeral was heartrending. Some of the neighbors tried to sing but i t was no use. One after another, several brethren tried to speak but n o words would come. It was the heartbroken father and husband who alon e could control his emotions enough to offer his tribute to the beloved w ife who had given her life to save her sons.
It is hard to imagine the heartbreak and gloom that enveloped the littl e settlement. Levi was crushed by the terrible tragedy, but still his va liant spirit held steadfast. When the other men said they wanted to giv e up the settlement,that they could not bear to live there any longer, Le vi begged them to stay and complete the mission President Young had sen t them to perform. At last when they still wavered, he said, "Well, if y ou must go, God be with you, but as for me, I will stay if I have to sta y alone." The other men remained.
Levi never dared give way to his grief before others because he felt tha t as their leader he must keep up the morale of the disheartened people . Jacob Hamblin told of finding him one day way up the canyon pouring ou t his grief and praying for strength. His health gradually broke and fiv e years later he was released from the Bishopric.
As soon as President Young heard the news of the fire, he set out in hi s buggy for Kanab to offer what comfort and spiritual strength he could . He had greatly admired Margery and was always free in expressing his c onfidence in Levi and his admiration and friendship from him. He said, " Brother Levi, Sister Margery went to heaven in a flame of glory." And ind eed her memory has always been enshrined as a heroine in the hearts of he r children and descendants. SOURCE: Some Incidents in the Life of Levi S tewart, Founder of Kanab, Utah; History of Kane Co, by Marjery Browne Cot tam, p 547 Researcher: Georgenia Stewart

MARRIAGE: In 1852, a friend, Brother Wimmer, drove up with a company o f emigrants. When Levi came across to see him he said, "Brother Levi , I have brought you a wife." Levi said, "Well, that's nice," thinking li ttle of it. But a few minutes later a young girl not yet twenty steppe d from behind one of the wagons and was introduced to him as Margery Wilk erson. A quick friendship between Levi and Margery developed into a life long devotion. They were married four months later, December 1852 in th e Office of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Sai nts, Salt Lake City, Utah. SOURCE: Some Incident in the Life of Levi Ste wart, Founder of Kanab Utah, History of Kane Co, by Marjery Browne Cottam , p 545 Researcher: Georgenia Stewart

DEATH: In December of that same first year, 1870, came the tragedy tha t was to leave its scar on the lives of this family and almost disrupt th e entire settlement of Kanab, Utah. The Navajo and Northern Indians ha d been making raids on the settlements. The young men took turns guardin g the cattle at night from a small dugout in the side of a hill. The oth er men took turns guarding the fort. Once Jacob Hamblin persuaded the Na vajos to come to Kanab and hold a peace conferenc as there was always ten sion.
On the night of December 14, the guard who was to relieve Brother Pugh a s guard at one o'clock did no awaken but seemed to be overpowered with sl eep. He was roused once, then twice, and even started to dress. Brothe r Pugh went home and to bed, thinking all was well, but in some way the g uard fell back over on the bed asleep, leaving the fort unguarded. At fo ur o'clock, fire was discovered in the Stewart section of the fort. Litt le Lucinda remembers how her father rushed to see what he could do. Marg ery quickly threw a spread around herself and rushed over to the burnin g portion. Their own room was safe as it was separated from the burnin g part by many feet. There was a space left for another room which had n ot yet been built and which was protected only by a row of wagons drawn t ogether. These wagons were used as sleeping quarters for some of the old er children. The kitchen roof was already ablaze so there was no hope o f saving that part of the house. But in the bedroom next to it, the on e on the corner, slept the boys, Margery's three, Artimacy's two, a hire d man, and Levi, the youngest son of the first wife, Melinda. This roo m had no windows as did none of the outside rooms of the fort in order t o make them impregnable to the Indians. The only exit was through the fl aming kitchen. Levi and the other men, knowing that this bedroom held st ores of kerosene and powder, seized axes and started battering out the lo gs of the wall. They got two logs out and crawled through into the suffo cating smoke-filled room. They found the beds empty and no one in the ro om. It was impossible to get into the blazing inferno of the kitchen. T hey knew that the smoking powder and kerosene might explode any minute, s o they crawled back out. Levi ordered the others out and carried two keg s of powder already smoking and dumped them into the creek. Then the ker osene exploded and went up in flames.
Little did Levi realize what was happening on the other side of the kitch en. When Margery rushed out of their bedroom, she immediately took in th e situation and knew that the only hope for the boys was through the kitc hen. Her mother's love was greater than her fears or her reasoning power , and unseen by any except her daughter Ella, who happened to be there fr om Pipe Springs, she rushed into the flames. Ella tried to follow her mo ther but was held back by the men. Once in the kitchen, Margery met Arti macy's boy Alonzo Lafayette and the hired man, Harvey Stout, who, blinde d by the smoke, were groping around trying to find an exit. She pushed t hem through the door and turned to find the others. No one knows what re ally happened then. The explosion prevented anyone else from entering . They found the six charred bodies; the mother and three boys were foun d huddled in the immense fireplace as if she had been trying to lift the m up the chimney. One was under the big stove, less burned than the othe rs. They dug out the bodies and sadly buried them in one grave. Alonz o told afterward of how his brother, Levi had tried, when they found them selves trapped, to lift the sod roof of the bedroom, but it had been to o firmly packed with grass and willows.
The funeral was heartrending. Some of the neighbors tried to sing but i t was no use. One after another, several brethren tried to speak but n o words would come. It was the heartbroken father and husband who alon e could control his emotions enough to offer his tribute to the beloved w ife who had given her life to save her sons .
It is hard to imagine the heartbreak and gloom that enveloped the littl e settlement. Levi was crushed by the terrible tragedy, but still his va liant spirit held steadfast. When the other men said they wanted to giv e up the settlement,that they could not bear to live there any longer, Le vi begged them to stay and complete the mission President Young had sen t them to perform. At last when they still wavered, he said, "Well, if y ou must go, God be with you, but as for me, I will stay if I have to sta y alone." The other men remained.
Levi never dared give way to his grief before others because he felt tha t as their leader he must keep up the morale of the disheartened people . Jacob Hamblin told of finding him one day way up the canyon pouring ou t his grief and praying for strength. His health gradually broke and fiv e years later he was released from the Bishopric.
As soon as President Young heard the news of the fire, he set out in hi s buggy for Kanab to offer what comfort and spiritual strength he could . He had greatly admired Margery and was always free in expressing his c onfidence in Levi and his admiration and friendship from him. He said, " Brother Levi, Sister Margery went to heaven in a flame of glory." And ind eed her memory has always been enshrined as a heroine in the hearts of he r children and descendants. SOURCE: Some Incidents in the Life of Levi S tewart, Founder of Kanab, Utah; History of Kane Co, by Marjery Browne Cot tam, p 547 Researcher: Georgenia Stewart


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Rachel WINNINGHAM

Father: Richard WINNINGHAM
Mother: Polly Mary Ann VAN HOOSER

Family 1: Jesse FREELS

  1.  Thomas WINNINGHAM
Family 2: George Washington FRANKLIN

  1. +Jahue WINNINGHAM
Family 3: James ROBBINS
  1.  Martha Rosetta ROBBINS
  2.  Twin ROBBINS

                              ______________________
 _Richard WINNINGHAM ________|
|                            |______________________
|
|--Rachel WINNINGHAM 
|
|                             _Isaac W. VAN HOOSER _
|_Polly Mary Ann VAN HOOSER _|
                             |_Polly POOR __________

INDEX


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